Skip to main content

About your Search

20131202
20131210
STATION
CSPAN 5
CSPAN2 2
KCSM (PBS) 2
KQED (PBS) 2
CNNW 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
LINKTV 1
LANGUAGE
English 22
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
phones are being monitored by the national security agency. that's according to a "the washington post" according to edward snowden. the spy agency says it does not collect data from phones in the u.s. >> the rescuers are holding out little hope for whales stranded in the ever glades. 4 dozen short-finned pilot whales swam into the shallows. six died. vets youthanized four more. a wealthy neighbourhood in louisiana wants to form its own city. we have more from baton rouge. >> jeffrey lee doesn't miss a moment with his grandchildren at baton rouge. >> they are not in school, but he knows education will be the key to a better life. >> i want them to go to school and learn what they can. >> it's a challenge in a city where 60% of the students are not learning at grade level. >> it's one of the worst school systems. how many generations of children do you disserve before you try sag different. >> lionel rainy is part of a group pushing for a different plan. the city of st george would encompass an area home to a quarter of the residents. if would control and run its own schools with tax re
at the national security agency are not just intercepting calls but also tracking the movements of phones around the world. the paper cites documents leaked by former nsa contractor edward snowden. it says agents collect 5 billion records every day on cell phones across the planet. the report says agents use that information to track people of interest and identify their associates. u.s. government officials say nsa personnel are trying to prevent terrorism and only monitoring non-americans. >>> the pris tij ous hotel in prag has turned a secret cold war underground bunker into a tourist destination. the aim is to show visitors how it was once used as a center for spy operations. the alta hotel recently opened the bunker to mark its 55th anniversary. during the cold war the luxury hotel was a popular destination for both western tourists and journalists. hidden 20 meters under ground it can only be reached by ladder. a hotel official says only a few knew it ever existed. on display is some original spy equipment such as a tape recorder for listening on each of the hotel's 94 rooms, also a floor
six months since ed snowden revealed the effort ops the national security agency phones' now congressman roger is investigating whether ed snowden was working alone or whether other governments may have played a role. catherine herridge is in washington. other governments to whom is he referring here? >> if you take a close review of the nasa nasa -- national security agency leaked documents they talk about the works overseas, and the chairman of the house intelligence committee, who gets regular brief examination -- briefings, says there is now evidence suggesting edward snowden had helped when he downloaded 200,000 documents. >> we know he did some things capability wise that were beyond his capabilities, meaning he used someone else's help to steal things from the people of the united states, classified information, information we use to keep america safe. >> and the former head of the nsa and said that his activities have permanently damaged u.s. security. >> it's very, very hard. this is the -- this is catastrophic for the safety and security of the american nation. what
operation by the national security agency while us president barack obama and twenty five other foreign heads of government or on canadian soil in june of two thousand ten hundred us operation was no secrets to canadian authorities. so can the canadian authorities not only knew about the find was going on in our country but they may have even participated in it and has privacy advocates crying foul earlier by steve anderson executive director of open media for more on this latest docu shock when first asked whether we should never feel like the cry is about these latest disclosures. well we already know a thing. really surprising that most canadians. we're a go it would only allow a foreign spy agency to spy on our soil actually go and our country said its operations and one in three people. as a stronger candidate in the g twenty. i think that he's impressed many came. it surprised me. even though the revelations. i can stay on for the update until you know in my reading chair. it was a the sta many others. i'm really not expect it to all of us and stay inspired. people in canada as to
be under surveillancy the n.s.a. they said the national security agency is tracking 5 billion cell phones every day. the paper cited documents from edward snowden. it means the spy agency could track the movement of almost any cell phone around the world. n.s.a. officials refused to comment, but said they don't collect data on sell phones in the united states. >>> tonight a new meningitis outbreak at the university of california, santa barbara o initials are racing to stop the bacteria spreading. brian rooney has more. >> four students at this cancer developed a rare form of meningitis in three weeks. one in four who catch it dee. 20% suffer permanent damage. >> when the outbreak started, when we had three cases two weeks ago, three cases in two weeks was a dangerous situation. >> a student, a freshman la cross player had such a serious case that both his feet had to be amputated. >> once it causes bloodpoichg, sepsis can be so overwelcoming, the body is tox. >>, and hand and feet are overwhelmed with infection andar amputated. >> students you warned to avoid close contact, sharing drinks
. >> the u.s. national security agency is gathering billions of records from mobile phones worldwide according to leaked top secret documents given to the paper by former edward snowden. the report says 5 bill yop records every 24 hours allows u.s. intelligence officials to track the movement of people in ways that were unimaginable. using tools such as code traveller, which can map relationships geographically with people and their most. american people say it is legal. it's a breach of privacy. let's discuss it with the ceo of spark digital, a digital marketing and social media company. to know the n.s.a. is spying on people using their mobile phones, sure that is no surprise. what is interesting about that to you. >> what is interesting is what they are tracking. date, time, speed, trajectory. that's what they are keeping historical records of. what is a lot of people don't know is they are not just looking at it just at this moment, but backwards in time when the phone came online. >> code traveller, meaning they can work out which group of people from in proximity to each other.
the u.s. national security agency is collecting billions of records of mobile phone locations from around the world every day. it is provided by edward snowden. we explain how a horrible phone can be turned into a tracking device. >> wherever you are in the world, as soon as you switch on your mobile phone, it tries to connect to the mobile network at the closest tower. when it does, your phone number is logged by the network, along with the tower you connected to, which means your location. if you're on the move, anyone with access to this information can track your route. the latest revelations suggest the n.s.a. is doing much more than just tracking individual suspects. by gathering and processing around 5 billion records each day, it is able to see which individuals are meeting or tracking together. >> you might be connected to a tower along with 100 other people. you move down the street and automatically you, fuel find connects to the next closest tower. let's say 20 of the 100 are moving the same direction you. move further down the road and say just five of the original 100
.s. national security agency is directing billions of records of mobile phone locations every day. how a mobile phone can be turned into a tracking device. >> wherever you are in the world, as soon as you switch on your mobile phone, it tries to connect to the mobile network. usually through the closest tower. as soon as it does, your phone number is logged with the network, along with which tower you have connected to. which means your location. >> if you are on the move, anyone with tract your rout. by gathering and processing 5 billion records each day, to see which individuals are traveling or meeting together. here is how it works. >> you may be connected to a tower, along with 100 other people. you move down the street, and automatically connects to the next closest tower. say 20 of the 100 are moving in the same direction you move further down the road, and say just five of the original 100 people, join you. a couple more towers and some time later just one person who is mirrored your movements. the assumption, you have some reason for being together. >> it raise as lot of question. it c
, the national security agency, top administration officials are now talking about splitting off control of the cyber warfare command, which is now controlled jointly by the head of the nsa, to make those two separate jobs because they say to give them both to the nsa director gives too much power to one man. what do you think of that idea? >> i actually think the idea is good, but not for the reasons the administration has put forward. this is not about the concentration of power. this is about the overburdening of responsibility. i was the director of nsa. i thought it was actually a full-time day work. i don't know you can be the drmsa , as we called him, and a four-star combatant commander. so again, it's not about the overconcentration of power. it's just that the responsibilities have grown too great. >> and intelligence officials are now talking about their real concern that nsa leaker edward snowden may have put together something that's been called a doomsday cache of top secret documents, much more damaging than anything he's released so far, and that they will be released if a
. and the "washington post" reported the national security agency collects roughly five billion records a day on the location of cell phones worldwide, based on documents leaked by former n.s.a. contractor edward snowden. >> woodruff: on the "newshour" online right now, archaeologists have discovered that we're all mutts. new tests on the oldest-known human d.n.a. reveal that homo sapiens have more ancestors than we had previously thought. read about that on our science page. all that and more is on our website newshour.pbs.org. >> ifill: and that's the "newshour" for tonight. on thursday, fast-food workers plan strikes in 100 cities across the country to protest low-wages. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. we'll see you online and again here tomorrow evening. for all of us here at the "pbs newshour," thank you and good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie calle
. >>> new details about how the national security agency gathers nearly 5 billion cell phone records around the world every day. those records are put into a huge database that contract the movements of individuals, map their relationships, how they're connected work they're calling were creates a web of information. >> bringing in our pentagon correspondent, barbara starr, on this story because, barbara, you hear about all of this, the cell phone locations and who they're trying to trace, is it americans, americans living abroad, how expansive is this, if you're overseas and you're on the phone? >> reporter: well, we don't know a lot about how expansive it is. "the washington post" reporting that this all came from more leaks by, guess who, edward snowden and documents that he had, and that is it about 5 billion cell phone records a day. how much does it affect americans? well, by all accounts, if you're an american, you're out of the country on business or may vation, you pick up your cell phone, use it, that call that record of that call, not the conversation itself, is most likely to be
intelligence agency lt. gen. michael flynn on national security. in a little more than an hour we will riata washington journal special on the national institutes of health. now, the head of the defense intelligence agency, lt. gen. michael flynn con challenges facing the intelligence community kind of unlimited resources and cyber threats. his comments at the institute of world politics are a little more than an hour. [inaudible conversations] >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. my name is john. i am president of the institute. for those of you are new to the institute of world politics, i would like to just introduce us and our mission. we are independent graduate school on national security and international affairs. we specialize in teaching all of the different arts of statecraft by which we mean the various instruments of national power, military strategy, intelligence, counterintelligence, diplomacy, the many arts and public diplomacy and sought power such as culture of a policy, information policy, political action, and that sort of thing. economic strategy and now all of these
.remely other concerns involved in the u.s., has a national security agencies monitoring and mitigation scheme to diplomatic relations between colombia and the u.s.? -- monitoring communications, kate e maddock between clinton and the u.s.? between colombia and the u.s.? >> we share with the u.s. and other intelligence agencies all of the information in there for spied therefore if we had on our common enemies, it has been done with the cooperation of the colombian authorities and u.s. authorities. information off spying outside that spirit of cooperation. if i knew about that, of course i would condemn it immediately. >> some of your neighbors in latin america have been furious by revelations of u.s. eavesdropping. is there anger justified? >> nobody likes to be spied. , if some and spies on you, you have all the right to get mad. they are spying without permission. to china, china's investment in latin america continues to grow. the country signed bilateral agreements last week. can you tell us more about that columbia-china economic relationship? do you see the effect it would have on that
for the colombia site. loosh b -- looking to other concerns to the u.s., have the national security agencies had relations between the colombia and the u.s.? >> we have been sharing information on this for a long time. colombia's very particular country in the sense that we share with the u.s. and other intelligence agencies, all the information, and, therefore, we have spied on our common enemy ies. it has been done with a cooperation of the colombia authorities and the u.s. authorities. now, i don't know of information of spying outside that sphere of cooperation. if i knew about that, then, of course, i would condemn it immediately. >> some of your neighbors in latin america, of course, have been infuriated by revelations of u.s. eves dropping. is their anger justified? >> well, nobody likes to be spied, and i think, yes, nor somebody spies on you, you have all the right to get mad, and so they have all the right to get mad. they are spied without commission. >> looking to china, china's investment in latin america, of course, continues to grow, and the country signed more than 50 bilateral c
recently with the national security agency eavesdropping disclosures. he said he was not aware the united states was eavesdropping on a german chancellor's personal cell phone. the glitches to the health care website is another that he has acknowledged he was not prepared for. on their own, these may seem relatively minor, but added up, you get the perception of a white house and a management team that is trying to do a lot of different things at the same time and not necessarily paying attention to the implementation of these major policy issues, whether national security in the case of the nsa, or whether it is his health care law, which is legacy. is it people not wanting to tell the president bad news? is he not willing to surround tell himith people who that things are wrong? there was a lot of bad news not shared with the president. this goes back to this year, the irs inspector general's report about paying particular attention to conservative groups. that, not aware of told of that, even though senior staff knew. surroundedy, he himself by people that he knew. he did not have many
, give us a call. guest: with the national security agency's eavesdropping ask posers your car he was saying here is not aware that the united states is eavesdropping on the german chancellor's personal cell phone. obviously the glitches to the health care website is another that he has acknowledged he was not prepared for. on their own, these may seem relatively minor, but added up you get the perception of a white house and a management team there that is trying to do a lot of different things at the same time and not speaking for the american people. he wasn't speaking for insurance companies. this does make him a liar. i just want to talk about legacy. it can be before he leaves office or after. is going to rule obama and hillary. they were trying to protect votes through consistent lives using various people as spokespeople and also, the perception they did not need -- they were so successful in we do not have to increase security. the second issue, another 15 seconds and i'm done. the of audible care at is nothing more than a trojan horse , the getting reparations for slaver
edward snowden reveals a massive program by the national security agency to track the location of cell phones around the world. according to "washington post" they are gathering 5 billion records a day on the location of cell phones oversee seas -- overseas. the nsa's tracking program may be the reason that president obama is not allowed to have an iphone. there may be concern that phones could easily reveal his location. apple's smartphone is a favorite of nsa agents because iphone's operating system has 38 different features that can be tracked. >>> 8:16. more incriminating allegations against the mayor of toronto, rob ford. newly-released court documents indicate gang members may have had a video of mayor ford smoking crack cocaine. the documents describe wiretap recordings of gang members talking about black mailing the mayor. reportedly police did recover a copy of the video from a laptop computer. >>> the man accused of a deadly shooting in san francisco over a popular gaming system is due back in court on monday to enter a plea. 21-year-old ronnie collins made his first court ap
was concerned with raining and the national security agency they would have to go after the funding. congress must be happy the way things are going because they don't seem to want to do anything about it. that is all i have to say. robert is on our line for independents. caller: i would like to i heard asay that recent blurb regarding president obama's attempt to rein in nsa surveillance. rathertly think it is disingenuous. it doesn't really matter what administration is in office. council,nal security these are agencies that are so entrenched in our government. they basically operate through a black budget. a lot of money that was siphoned through taxes are going to be totally off the books. it doesn't matter what any president or any policy -- they want to operate independent of the administration and the office. beware of the military and industrial complex. bob is on our line for democrats. caller: i would like to remind folks that when george bush was trying to pass to this -- pass this patriots act, the big response to people worried about losing their freedom or thatty's or whatever w
the lesser of two evils. good evening, katherine. >> reporter: the national security council staff and the intelligence agencies are referring all questions about the u.s. government's contacts with syria to the state department where today a spokesperson tries to play down direct talks as old news. >> we've been engaging with the broad section for a long time. it's been ongoing. of course we're incredibly concerned about the terrorist threat in syria. we've made that very clear. that's why we talk to the opposition all the time. >> reporter: as first reported by the "wall street journal" the u.s. and gulf nations are engaging with islamist groups in order to strengthen those who are not directly linked to the al qaeda franchises in syria. while these groups including the newly organized islamic front are not members of al qaeda, they still fly the black flag and support the establishment of an islamic state within syria, which runs counter to democratic principles. as for the syrian president assad, who's agreed to send a delegation to january peace talks in geneva, switzerland, d
spilling in russia the japanese parliament that diet recently pasta that is setup to see us signed national security council it's a sixty member government launched its job is to coordinate all the ministries and other agencies are involved in japan's foreign and defense offense. the headquarters of the steel industry would be installed within the cabinet secretary. intel and the is a tenuous peace off two days of anti government protests for the first time the minute readers of the country have spoken they see the political situation is returning to normal slowly but surely often days of violent protests and eighty sheets though the press today he says been drilled out the possibility of any kind of cool warning to mention ministry saying the ministry forces would not take a beating know in what is an evolving political situation the bottom was a protest is when you get a rally of the national police headquarters in bangkok to force their way through the gates of the silent right to the protest leader us a pep talks about says the fight is going to go on despite efforts to defuse the crisi
are and what we are doing on behalf of national security. to give you some idea about the 5irection of one of the big agencies that we have that are every day, 24 hours a day, seven days a week in 142 countries around the world with 17,000 people, doing the nation's business. we have some talented men and women and i will talk about them. john, thank you very much. i want to thank for the great introduction. i want to thank the institute of world politics and the staff that puts these things on. it is important that we keep doing i think it is a really important endeavor that we keep doing this. politicstute of world and your personal dedication to hosting this annual lecture is a testament to the institute's commitment to training a new generation of critical thinkers. the professionals in this room who recognize the value of studying history when confronting modern issues of national security and world politics. as early as 1932, there was a which begins with a surprise attack on pearl harbor. part of the curriculum. i have a graduate degree. in march of 1931, intelligence reports warn o
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)